How To Start Brewing Beer At Home – Beerconomics

Up to this point, you have a pretty good idea how to start brewing beer at home. The next step in helping you decide where to begin will be a look at the space required for your equipment and the economics behind. I will use the levels from the different types of brew kits.

Low Cost and Little Space Required – Level 1

In my review of these kits, I talked about the need to think about this step as you decide how to start brewing beer at home. Your decision here is whether you are committed to making your own beer. This step focuses on fermentation so your only purchase should be a fermenter. The decision comes on whether you want to continue up the levels. These batches are 2-gallons and, as you move forward, your batches will be 5-gallons.

Space Requirements: Very little. Your kit will consist of bottles and a fermenter, but they are relatively small. You will need a dark space for the fermentation and bottle aging, but a closet would work fine.

Beerconomics:

  • Cost of the starter kit: $35 – $109
  • Refill Kit Cost: $16 – $28
  • 12-ounce beers made: 24
  • Batches to break even (assume $2/bottle at store): 1 to 4 depending on the starter kit

Medium Cost and Little Space Required – Level 2

Brewing costs are rising

In helping you to decide how to start brewing beer at home, I would direct you to this level. You will still be making beer rather than brewing beer, but in this case the fermenter would follow you up through the levels. The recipes are the same as in level 1 with the only difference being now you would make 5-gallons instead of 2.

Space Requirements: Still very little. You will have a larger fermenter and more bottles, but this should still easily fit into a closet.

 

Beerconomics:

  • Cost of the Starter Kit: $200
  • Refill Kit Cost: $60
  • 12-ounce beers made: 48
  • Batches to Break Even: about 3

High Cost and Modest Storage – Level 3

In the next step of learning how to get started brewing beer at home, we get to the first brewing level. The equipment needed will take up some room and probably won’t fit into a closet…unless you don’t want anything else in there. You will have a rather larger brew pot and the fermenter from Level 2.

Space Requirements: You will need a decent amount. You will need to fit a 6-gallon pot for brewing, your fermenter, and your bottles. You can probably still squeeze it into a closet, but it will be tight and you will have to sacrifice something.

Beerconomics:

  • Cost of the Starter Kit: $500 ($400 if you saved your fermenter)
  • Refill Kit Cost: $70
  • 12-ounce beers made: 48
  • Batches to Break Even: 10 to 14

High Cost and Lots of Storage – Level 4

All the equipment from Level 3 will transfer here. You will still need more equipment as there are more steps. For what it is worth, this is not where I would recommend learning how to start brewing beer at home.

Get Started Brewing BeerSpace Requirements: You will need a lot of storage. You will need to fit a 6-gallon pot for brewing, your fermenter, your bottles, and a few coolers. At this point, I hope you have a spare room or a garage.

Beerconomics:

  • Cost of the Starter Kit: $900 ($400 if you saved your Level 3 equipment)
  • Refill Kit Cost: $50
  • 12-ounce beers made: 48
  • Batches to Break Even: 10 to 14

How To Start Brewing Beer At Home – The Decision

I have repeated multiple times throughout, if you are serious about brewing your own beer (Level 3) then you want to start at Level 2. You can alternate between making and brewing while you build up your inventory. Level 1 is for those who just want something different. At the end of the day, if you just want beer available without going to the store it can always be delivered.

If you have any questions about the costs or the storage requirements, comment below or email me at nate@drinkgreatbeers.com

Cheers!

Drink Great Beers - How to start brewing beer at home

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